Detroit Parents Receive National Award for LGBT Equality Work in Catholic Church

October 31, 2013

Catholic parents of LGBT people have been some of the most passionate and effective voices for equality and inclusion in both the church and society,  Their natural love for their children motivates them to try to make the world a better place for them, and so they are often tireless in their efforts.  Similarly, they know that understanding or accepting a child’s sexual or gender identity can be challenging for many Catholic parents who are just learning of these realities for the first time.

Linda Karle-Nelson and Tom Nelson

So, it is fitting that two Catholic parents were honored this past weekend with a top award at the PFLAG (Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) convention in Washington, DC.   Linda Karle-Nelson and Thomas Nelson, a married couple from the Detroit area, received PFLAG’s highest honor, the Betty DeGeneres Award (named for lesbian comedian Ellen DeGeneres’ mother) for their work not only in helping to spread the word of LGBT acceptance and family togetherness, but particularly for their advocacy and ministry within the Catholic community.

The Detroit Free Press reported on the background of the award and why this couple was chosen:

“PFLAG president Jody Huckaby said more famous and visible people were nominated for the honor — only the second time it has been given since Betty DeGeneres received the first award two years ago. But Huckaby said the Nelsons were deserving because they’re seeking to change minds while staying members of the Catholic Church.

“ ‘They are a tremendous example of parental love and affirmation. And then talking about it, and talking about it in one of the most challenging areas — the faith community,’ Huckaby said. ‘Our work in faith communities is the most important work we’re doing — because it’s not easy.’ ”

The Nelsons, who married as widowers in 2006, each have a gay son from marriages to their first spouses.  They met at a PFLAG meeting and fell in love, serving as living proof that it’s a lie that LGBT advocacy doesn’t help promote heterosexual relationships and marriages!   Though they work with PFLAG groups, the main bulk of their Catholic work has been as part of Fortunate Families, a national network of Catholic parents of LGBT children.   Linda served as the organization’s board president, and Tom has served on the board. Both have been active in the organization’s variety of activities.

They will be hosting a Fortunate Families gathering at Detroit’s Christ the King Catholic parish on Saturday, November 9th, 2013, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.    You can  find more information and register for this free event by clicking here.   Registration deadline is November 4th.

The Detroit Free Press quoted reactions about the award from the couple’s two gay sons:

“John Karle, 44, who is gay, said his mother’s and stepfather’s activism amazes him, and inspired him to join a gay-rights protest in front of St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City.

“ ‘She is such a strong and persistent voice in support, and particularly support for gay kids in schools, and in churches with their families,’ said Karle, a publicist for St. Martin’s Press and churchgoing Catholic who will be at the ceremony. ‘It inspires me. I just can’t sit back and do nothing if she’s outside marching out front of the archdiocese’s office.’ ”

“Tom Nelson’s son, Mark, who is gay, as well as three of Nelson’s five daughters, also will attend.

“ ‘I’m proud of them,’ Mark Nelson, who lives in metro Detroit.”

Tom Nelson recently published An Ordinary Catholic:  A View from the Pewa memoir on his evolution in faith and reflections on a new vision of equality and justice for the Catholic Church.

The Nelsons were featured in a previous Bondings 2.0 post when they organized a demonstration at the Archdiocese of Detroit’s headquarters to protest Archbishop Allen Vigneron’s suggestion that Catholics who support marriage equality should not receive communion.

New Ways Ministry salutes these prophetic leaders, and we are deeply grateful for their ministry and witness!  May they continue to aid and inspire other Catholic parents to do likewise.

–Francis DeBernardo, New Ways Ministry

 

 

 


NEWS NOTES: October 30, 2013

October 30, 2013

News NotesHere are some items that you might find of interest:

1)  The Tablet reported that Australian former priest Greg Reynolds, whose support for same-sex marriage was reported to have been part of the reason that the Vatican laicised and and excommunicated him, has revealed that the main reason for these actions was because of an incident where a piece of host was given to a dog as part of a liturgical service at the “Inclusive Catholics” community that Reynolds established after he resigned the priesthood in May 2011.

2) The ministry and mission of Dignity/San Antonio was profiled on MySanAntonio.com.   Members from this Texas chapter of DignityUSA, a national organization for LGBT Catholics, are reported as being cautiously hopeful about Pope Francis’ recent positive comments about lesbian and gay people.  “Personally, I felt encouraged by it. I think we’re all hopeful because it’s a significant change in tone,” said Chris, a gay man and Dignity leader. “But we’re also not naïve to think it represented substantive change.”

3)  A priest in Worcester, Massachusetts, who this past summer cut parish ties to the Worcester Art Museum because they started renting their facility for same-sex wedding ceremonies, has  admitted to embezzling almost a quarter of a million dollars from his parish and school, reported Justice For All.

4)  The Catholic hierarchy and conservative politicians in Peru, a heavily Catholic nation, are opposing a recently introduced national bill to establish civil unions for lesbian and gay couples, reported HispanicallySpeakingNews.com.  The bill will be debated by the nation’s congress in March of next year.

–Francis DeBernardo, New Ways Ministry


Analyzing the Homophobia Lurking Beneath Marriage Equality Opponents’ Argument

October 30, 2013

I read lots of opinion pieces for and against marriage equality from a variety of perspectives, especially from Catholic and religious positions.  I daresay that I read at least two or three a day–and could probably read a lot more if I had the time to digest all that come my way.  Because many of these pieces repeat arguments that I have heard many times before, my eyes are always attracted to ones that have a freshness to them that make me think in new ways.

Heidi Schlumpf

Such was the case when I read Heidi Schlumpf’s essay in The National Catholic Reporter last week, entitled “Gay marriage foes change their tactics, but not their tune.”   Schlumpf points out a new trend in the way that marriage equality opponents are making their case lately. Because polls continue to show that greater majorities are supporting marriage equality, opponents seem to realize that their arguments about the sinfulness of homosexuality are no longer effective, and they are using a different approach:

“. . . an increasing number of ‘traditional’ marriage supporters are taking a different tactic. They’re not talking about gay people at all — or if they are, it’s only to voice newfound support for LGBT folks.

“It’s not about gay people anymore. It’s about the children.”

Schlumpf cites the recent case of an interview with William B. May, president for Catholics for the Common Good, in which he argued against same-sex marriage, where he stated:

“This issue is not about homosexuality at all. It is about whether marriage is a reality that not only unites a man and a woman with each other, but with any children born from their union.”

Schlumpf asserts that May’s argument is “a definition of marriage that is not ‘adult-centric,’ but rather exists to unite children with their biological moms and dads.”  For her, this definition does not match the reality of her life or withstands the test of logic:

“As the parent of two children not born to me, I understandably question a definition of marriage that wouldn’t include my own union with my husband — not to mention those marriages of men and women that, for whatever reason, don’t include children at all.

“Yet when I pose this question to those who defend traditional marriage in this way, they are usually very supportive of adoptive parenting, seeing couples as almost heroic for creating families by adopting children who need parents. Straight couples, that is.

“To be honest, I find these arguments logically problematic. It seems to me that not opposing legal marriage for adoptive families (two ‘adult-centric’ folks with children not born to them) but doing so for LGBT families (two ‘adult-centric’ folks with children not born to them) reveals that the real problem for defenders of ‘traditional’ marriage is still homosexuality.

“The new ‘spin’ may be that it’s about the kids, but it’s really about homosexuality.”

Schlumpf concludes with an appeal to the new direction set by Pope Francis:

“When even the pope is encouraging Catholics to follow God and ‘endorse the existence of [gay and lesbian people] with love’ rather than ‘reject and condemn’ them, it’s clear that homophobic arguments just aren’t going to work anymore. But neither will defending marriage as an institution only for children and their biological parents.”

What I find refreshing in Schlumpf’s analysis is that she exposes the homophobia which underlies the faulty logic of an argument that on the surface denies being homophobic at all.  Such analysis is needed now more than ever, as Catholic leaders make more use of this type of argument than most religious leaders do.

–Francis DeBernardo, New Ways Ministry


Catholic Woman to Bishops: “Do You Not Fear Being Left Behind?”

October 29, 2013

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops will gather in Baltimore this November for their fall assembly. A new president and vice-president will be elected and the bishops will discuss the future of their campaign against marriage equality.

In light of Pope Francis’ more pastoral and welcoming tone, many observers are wondering how the US bishops will evolve on LGBT issues. This post is the first of several in the coming weeks that will examine the US bishops and LGBT matters.

Bishops remain outspoken in states where equal rights are being codified, and also in places where employees at Catholic institutions are fired at an alarming rate because of LGBT issues. As recently as September, the USCCB released new strategies for opposing marriage equality in a seven-part web series reported on by ThinkProgress.

Taken together, these words and actions by anti-equality Catholic leadership reveal how far they are from the growing majority of Catholics who endorse equal marriage rights and equality in employment.

Carla McDonough

A piece in The Huffington Post by Cara McDonough questions the bishops’ priorities when so many issues threatening the life and dignity of people go unaddressed. McDonough writes:

“I still identify as a Catholic because I believe organized religion can do good in ways amplified by the fact that its very existence centers around a literal and figurative room of faithful, optimistic believers…

“I don’t think I’m mistaken in assuming that most Catholics, like me, remain Church members not out of fear or guilt, but because we believe that we can create positive change in the world…

“Notably missing from this defensive agenda are any positive action items to enact change in a troubled world that could use our help.”

McDonough contrasts the bishops’ agenda with Pope Francis, who has called for Catholics to focus less on stopping marriage equality and more on creating justice for the poor and marginalized, writing:

“While I wish you’d included even one tiny agenda item discussing, or at least acknowledging, the Pope’s message, I am, sadly, not surprised that you didn’t.

“That’s because it’s become undeniably apparent that your agenda — both small scale, at meetings like the upcoming one, and large scale, guiding your every move as a religious body — is to exorcise all that you deem wrong; to rally against the nuns conducting on-the-ground ministry to the sick and impoverished, and against the ‘sinful’ activists open to the idea of same-sex marriage.”

She concludes with a question that should give the bishops pause:

“Pope Francis motivates the masses because his message speaks to worthy goals that we, as a faith, can work towards, together.

“Do you not fear being left behind?”

Check back in the coming days for further analysis and opinions from Catholics speaking at and about their bishops. If you’re so inclined, why not follow Pope Francis’ lead and write your bishop a letter? If you do, let us know about it in the ‘Comments’ section below or by emailing us at info@newwaysministry.org

–Bob Shine, New Ways Ministry


Malta Bishop Apologizes to Lesbian and Gay People While Opposing Civil Unions’ Bill

October 28, 2013

Bishop Charles Scicluna

A Catholic bishop from Malta made a surprising statement on a popular television talk show in that country when he apologized over the airways for the hurt that Catholic leaders have caused lesbian and gay people.

Auxiliary Bishop Charles Scicluna appeared on “Xarabank,” hosted by Peppi Azzopardi, to discuss that nation’s civil unions bill, which the Catholics bishop there oppose, in part because it would allow lesbian and gay couples to adopt children.  The Malta Independent reported on the bishop’s words, which were in response to comments from gay couples who were guests on the show who :

“The bishop was confronted by gay couples who refuse to understand why the Church continues to make obstacles for them to have same rights as heterosexual couples.

“Scicluna did not mince his words and, while holding his ground on the teachings of the Church that marriage should be exclusive to the union between men and women, he made a historical statement by asking the gay community for forgiveness for each time those representing the Church made their (gays) life miserable and harder.”

His apology received applause from the gay guests and the studio audience.  Bishop Scicluna’s apology, while a good step, is not to be confused with strong support for lesbian and gay people.  Just last week, he published a letter opposing the civil unions bill in The Times of Malta  In the letter, he stated:

“In a nutshell marriage is for the family. It is not simply a socially recognised partnership. The proposed bill intends to put all this behind us in the name of the asserted equality of same sex (homosexual) couples to couples of different sex (heterosexual) couples.

“This asserted equality is a no-brainer when we deal with human dignity and the right to freedom from unjust discrimination. It does not stand the test of logic when it comes to the openness to the gift of parenthood.”

You can watch a video of the apology below, however the bishop and the others speak in Maltese.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeTJzfGUdc0

This is not the first time that Bishop Scicluna has made headlines with statements critical of a doctrinaire approach to lesbian and gay people.  In February of this year, he criticized a public letter by a Catholic man who said that lesbian and gay people can only experience lust, and not love.  Scicluna refuted the letter writer, saying that was not the teaching of the church.

Bondings 2.0 recently questioned the Maltese bishops’ opposition to the civil unions bill because they did so by quoting Pope Francis’ call for a more open attitude towards lesbian and gay people, which seemed somewhat incongruous.

The question this newer story raises is: can an apology be sincere when the bishop opposes legalizing civil unions for lesbian and gay couples?   Can someone authentically hold these two positions?    Post your thoughts in the “Comments” section of this post.

–Francis DeBernardo, New Ways Ministry


CAMPUS CHRONICLES: Macklemore, Marriage Equality, & Constructively Addressing Conflict

October 27, 2013

Macklemore

Bondings 2.0 started the “Campus Chronicles” series a year ago with the desire to highlight  the struggles and successes for LGBT welcome at Catholic colleges universities. While many challenges still exist, we also recognize that campuses contain many hopeful signs of where the Church overall may be headed. In that light, this post features two colleges which have seen both sides of the coin recently. Creighton University, in Omaha, Nebraska, and Providence College, in Providence, Rhode Island, constructively dealt with controversies related to marriage equality in ways that signify the progress being made and the work which still remains.

Creighton University

The Students Union Program Board at this Jesuit school sponsored a ticket giveaway to a concert by Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, which initiated student protests due to the artists’ outspoken support for marriage equality. Macklemore, who was raised Catholic, topped charts in 2012 with his song “Same Love” and since then continues to advocate for LGBT equality.

Students protested the ticket distribution in a letter to the Student Union and University President, causing the giveaway to be delayed while administrators met with the protestors. Two protesting students also wrote a letter to the editor in the campus newspaper, The Creightonianexplaining their views. They requested that Creighton cancel the ticket giveaway, so as to not be seen supporting an artist who happens to support marriage equality.

Creighton administrators, however, allowed the giveaway to proceed.  Omaha.com reported on the administrators’ statement, as well as general student reactions:

“The university said it is focused on educating students on social issues and that, ‘in the past, the university has hosted debates on the issue of same-sex marriage. We have had open sessions on this topic which centered on (Catholic) tenets of understanding and inclusion.’ “

“Dozens of students and alumni took to Twitter to complain about the delay in the ticket giveaway.”

The news website also noted that last year Macklemore and Lewis performed at a number of Catholic schools, including Boston College, University of San Francisco, and St. Joseph’s University, Philadelphia.  They also note that Creighton has allowed previous performers who have conflicted with Catholic teaching on marriage and other issues:

“In the past, Creighton has hosted artists and speakers whose values don’t match up with the university’s. Some have since come out in support of gay marriage. Fergie from the Black Eyed Peas, which performed at Creighton in 2004, has publicly pushed for President Barack Obama to do more to support gay marriage. In October, Creighton sponsored a concert free for students that featured 3OH!3, a band widely criticized for sexism and misogyny in its lyrics.”

Providence College

In September, Providence administrators cancelled a planned lecture by philosophy professor John Corvino on marriage equality. The decision raised serious questions about the College’s welcome for LGBT students and academic freedom. Students and faculty met that same week on the night of the cancelled event to discuss these issues. What followed was a growing student movement, a strong resolution condemning the College’s action from the Academic Senate, and national media attention.

Now, The Brown Daily Herald reports these actions resulted in positive change. The lecture was rescheduled for this coming spring, which will now be a debate with leading anti-equality activist Sherif Girgis. Additionally, the school’s President Brian Shanley apologized for the way in which the decision was made. Most important of all, the Board of Trustees adopted a non-discrimination policy that includes sexual orientation and gender identity. As the Herald reports:

“The student congress and faculty senate voted last year to change the college’s non-discrimination policy statement, but the Board of Trustees had yet to approve it, said Catherine Jones, a senior at Providence College. If the demands were not met by Friday at 5 p.m., the students wrote in their email, they planned to hold a silent demonstration that Saturday during a celebration honoring the opening of a new campus building, Terrones said.

“On Friday at about 3:30 p.m., Shanley announced that the school’s Board of Trustees had amended the policy to protect students of all gender identities and sexual orientations from discrimination on campus, Terrones said.”

The Friarfighters, as the group leading this movement call themselves, cancelled the protest amid promises to continue pushing Providence administrators towards a greater acceptance of LGBT people on campus.

Lessons?

The events at both Creighton University and Providence College offer students at Catholic colleges, and those who support them, at least two lessons.

First, for the most part the leadership in Catholic higher education increasingly understands the need to create inclusive, safe campus for all sexual orientations and gender identities. There is tremendous progress being made, and in the Creighton case it was the administration who largely defended the Macklemore giveaway against student anti-LGBT activists. Administrators can be forces for good on LGBT issues, and often the best approach is for students, faculty, staff, and administrators to work as partners to enhance inclusivity and Catholic identity.

Second, acceptance of equality is not yet universal, and some Catholic colleges remain deficient in protecting and affirming their LGBT community members. This does not mean however growth is not possible, but it may require students, or administrators, taking action. At Providence College, students successfully organized to persuade the Board of Trustees into adopting a non-discrimination policy which will tangibly improve the welcome for LGBT people on that campus.

Finally, students, employees, and alumni can on other Catholic campuses can take a first step by helping the schools to adopt employment non-discrimination policies. Such policies make words of welcome become real and tangible.  For more information on how to do this, you can click here or contact Bob Shine at youngadults@newwaysministry.org.

–Bob Shine, New Ways Ministry


Illinois Catholics Turn Out to Support Marriage Equality Demonstration

October 26, 2013
Screen Shot 2013-10-25 at 6.52.15 PM

Catholics for Marriage Equality Illinois in Springfield.

Catholics joined with thousands of other Illinois marriage equality supporters this past week for a March on Springfield,  to support the bill for marriage equality in that state.    A coalition called Catholics for Marriage Equality Illinois showed up stalwartly in rainy weather to let state lawmakers and others know that their Catholic faith urged them to work for legal protections for gay and lesbian couples and their families.

The Catholics for Marriage Equality coalition is comprised of members and supporters of Chicago and West Suburban Call To Action chapters, Faithful of Southern Illinois, Dignity/ChicagoFortunate Families, and New Ways Ministry.

The fate of the marriage equality bill, SB10, is currently undecided,  The Chicago Tribune noted this about the march:

“The show of force that police estimated at 3,000 people ran up against the political reality that there’s little indication the Illinois House is any closer to approving a gay marriage bill than it was before a summer of lobbying efforts.”

But the newspaper also noted that if the bill does pass the legislature. the Catholic governor of Illinois, Pat Quinn, is prepared to sign it into law.  The article stated:

“Gov. Pat Quinn, a practicing Roman Catholic, has vowed to sign the gay marriage bill if it reaches his desk. . . .  [He] said he decided to support same-sex marriage against the teachings of the Catholic Church as a matter of ‘conscience.’

” ‘I believe everyone of faith should listen to their conscience, and I have in my case,’ Quinn said. ‘The time for marriage equality has come. This is our time. This is our moment.’”

Catholics who were at the event said that the news media generally failed to recognize the strong faith contingent in the demonstration.  Instead, a number of media reports focused on the fact that Springfield’s Bishop Thomas Paprocki refused to allow Catholics who support marriage equality to enter the cathedral to pray the rosary. The Tribune reported:

“Paprocki said the plan by demonstrators to pray for gay marriage amounted to blasphemy, but he noted that ‘our cathedral and parish churches are always open to everyone who wishes to repent their sins and ask for God’s forgiveness.’ “

Governor Quinn called Paprocki’s reaction “disappointing.”

The Catholics who marched tell another story of how their witness touched and empowered others at the demonstration.  Lena Woltering, of Faithful of Southern Illinois, commented:

“There was good reaction to the Catholic presence.  A young lesbian couple noticed I was holding the Catholics for Marriage Equality sign and asked if I was from Springfield.  I told them I was not and they proceeded to tell me how they had gone to the Springfield Cathedral that morning for Eucharist and throughout the service the priest was very hateful, saying good Catholics should be appalled that the rally was taking place and he encouraged all to attend the anti-gay marriage rally the following day.  They had tears in their eyes as they spoke and thanked us for being visible at the rally.  Quite a few others stopped to thank us for our presence.”
Barbara Marian, of Fortunate Families, told the following story:
“It was cold and raining in Springfield on Tuesday, October 22nd but standing among the more than 3,000 chanting and cheering advocates of equal marriage we were flooded with warmth and hope and joy and gratitude to be there and to know we will soon see the day that all citizens of Illinois will be able to marry the person they love.”A number of advocates from other mainline faith communities were present and waving their signs and we Catholics appeared to have the largest number of supporters under the Catholics for Marriage Equality and Fortunate Families banners.”The speakers and the great music were rousing and wonderful but the most encouraging aspect of the rally for us was the constant steam of people coming up to talk to us and take photos of us with the banners so we know that we ‘went home’ with hundreds of the marchers and will appear thousands of times on their friends and families’ Facebook pages.

“Some of us strolled among the people in the crowd offering our greetings and giving out the Catholics for Marriage Equality bumper stickers on paint stirrers when they asked, ‘Oo-o! Where can I get one of THOSE?’   Thousands saw that we were there on that important day and were happy to know Catholics from the pews were working with them to bend the arc of history in Illinois toward justice and equality for all.  “

–Francis DeBernardo, New Ways Ministry

 



New Jersey Legalizes Marriage Equality, as Catholics Rejoice

October 24, 2013

New Jersey became the 14th state to legalize marriage equality on Monday, and it appears marriages will continue unhindered by further legal challenges. The road to this victory was paved by Catholics on both sides, and could be indicative of  future Catholic influences.

Governor Chris Christie, a Catholic, ended his appeal in the state’s Supreme Court against the late September ruling by Judge Mary Jacobson, also a Catholic, that legalized same-gender marriages. According to Christie, the Court’s previous denial of his request to forestall marriage licenses until the appeal was heard was evidence enough that marriage equality would be upheld on appeal.

While the governor promised to uphold the law, he also criticized the judicial means through which the state achieved equal marriage rights. As Bondings 2.0 previously noted, Christie is a 2016 presidential hopeful and is walking the Republican tight-rope around marriage equality. He emphasized the issue should still be put to New Jersey voters.

Jacobson’s was the first state court ruling to legalize same-sex marriage after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act in June. The move extended hundreds of tax, medical and other legal benefits to same-sex couples, but only in states that provided them “lawful marriages.” As a state which had civil unions but not full marriage for same-gender couples, New Jersey was left out of reaping these benefits, the Supreme Court ruled.

New Ways Ministry‘s supporters in New Jersey have welcomed the news of marriage equality coming to the state. Melina Waldo, the mother of a gay son, stated:

Melina Waldo

“Marriage equality has triumphed in New Jersey after many years of hard work by gay and lesbian people and their supporters.  We suffered defeats and disappointments along the way and strong opposition from the Catholic hierarchy as well as a veto by governor Christie.  Although the bishops did their utmost to hold back the tide of equality, the Catholic people never wavered in their support.  In fact, the percentage of Catholic people who support marriage equality has risen steadily as the years went by.  Not an insignificant factor in heavily Catholic New Jersey.

“I am so happy for all our gay and lesbian residents of New Jersey, particularly for young people like my friend John who testified at the state senate at least twice.   His testimony ended with the lament that he felt like a second-class citizen in his own state.

“For me the journey to marriage equality began years ago when my friends Diane Marini and Marilyn Maneeley  asked me to accompany them to the Borough Hall in our town where they were going to apply for a marriage license.  They were among seven couples chosen by Lambda Legal to sue the state of New Jersey for the right to marry.  When the clerk politely refused their request, we walked out and the lawsuit began.

“So for us it is a time to rejoice but a sad time as well because Marilyn did not live to see the results of her courageous effort to reach this happy conclusion.  She would be so pleased for all those who will benefit in the future. “

Dugan McGinley

Dugan McGinley, a lecturer in Catholic Studies at Rutgers University and the author of  Acts of Faith, Acts of Love: Gay Catholic Autobiographies as Sacred Textssaid:

“I am awestruck when I think how far we have come in such a short amount of time. When we were organizing to make LGBT Catholic concerns visible during the papal visit to Denver 20 years ago, who would have thought that by 2013, fourteen states would have legalized same-sex marriage?!

“It is gratifying to be receiving congratulatory notes from friends on this occasion, but we have all played a role in this success. I am grateful to every LGBT person who has had the courage to be open with someone else about their identity. The biggest difference we all can make is being visible so that people see that laws and theology about sex and gender affect real people.”

While it is already known that large majorities of US Catholics support marriage equality, of note in New Jersey is the respectful acceptance even Catholics opposed to LGBT rights have shown.  It is clear that Catholics in government, like Judge Jacobson and Governor Christie, are acting in a spirit of authentic religious liberty by separating their personal views from those demands required of them by civil law. In addition, fellow parishioners at Judge Jacobson’s parish spoke to NJ.com with a moderated opposition:

“McKillup and several other St. Mary parishioners interviewed after Mass said they believed in the separation of church and state, and that it was understandable Jacobson might view an issue differently from the bench than from a pew…

“St. Mary’s parishioner and choir member Barbara Paige said she shared the Catholic Church’s official view that marriage is between a man and a woman. But putting herself in Jacobson’s shoes, Paige said she did not fault the judge for ruling in favor of marriage equality…

“Another parishioner at St. Mary, Ben Barsolona, said he was opposed to same-sex marriage. But Barsolona, 55, said he did not fault Jacobson for the ruling, and he sympathized with gay couples and individuals.”

With New Jersey, one-third of US states now have equal marriage rights and this number should grow soon. Personal opposition remains in many Catholics, but perhaps beliefs promoted by the bishops that marriage equality will create social ills or threaten the Church’s well-being are being discarded as they are proven false. While work remains in the Church to create broader acceptance of LGBT people and their families, could New Jersey signal an ending to Catholic political opposition against equal rights?

–Bob Shine, New Ways Ministry


NEWS NOTES: October 23, 2013

October 23, 2013

News NotesHere are some items you might find of interest:

(1) The Archbishop of Lima, Peru, has publicly implied a legislator in that country is gay. Cardinal Juan Luis Cipriani Thorne was speaking on a radio program when he attacked the Carlos Bruce, who is the legislator behind a bill legalizing civil unions. Gay Star News quotes the cardinal as saying, “If a person has made some alternate choices, that’s their problem and he can do whatever he wants on his own.” Bruce chose not to reply to the comment.

(2) As marriage equality becomes law in Scotland, the Catholic hierarchy is warning it may imitate the French model and separate sacramental marriages from civil licensing. Archbishop Leo Cushley and the Bishops’ Conference of Scotland said legal concerns are to blame, as they fear priests could be liable if they refuse to marry a same-gender couple. Pro-LGBT groups claim this is just politicking, and the Scottish government confirmed religious institutions would not be forced to provide same-gender marriages, according to The Scotsman.

(3) Bishops in Nigeria issued a statement at the conclusion of the Conference of Catholic Bishops of Nigeria meetings that decried foreign organizations who are promoting marriage equality, along with condemning condom usage. Gay Star News reports that anti-gay legislation is increasing in the nation which has passed a “Jail All the Gays” law and banned diplomats with same-gender partners.

(4) Rosario Crocetta is seeking to clean up waste and corruption in Sicily, which is languishing amid debt and the Mafia. The New York Times offers an in-depth profile of this Italian politician who is the region’s leader, and who also happens to be a gay Catholic, in which he discusses faith, sexuality, and conflicts with local clergy.

–Bob Shine, New Ways Ministry


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