Ireland’s Catholics March Onward for LGBT Equality

September 8, 2014

St. Paul community members marching in Newry Pride

Ireland has been a heavily Catholic nation historically, and Catholics have become more LGBT-supportive in recent years, and particularly in recent weeks. Below, Bondings 2.0 offers a round up of several Catholic LGBT stories emerging from Eire.

Catholic Students Stand Out in Pride Parade

Students from St. Paul’s High School in Bessbrook, Northern Ireland, participated in local Pride celebrations last weekend, led by principal and noted proponent of Catholic education Jarlath Burns. St. Paul’s is one of the country’s largest secondary schools and their delegation during the Newry parade in County Armagh is thought to be a first. Upperclass students received an invitation to march in the parade via the school’s Facebook page, which noted:

” ‘We are proud to be a school that embraces diversity and promotes inclusivity, further demonstrating commitment to our Catholic ethos…The rainbow flag will be flown at the school to mark our support for equality for all.’ “

Burns, facing some criticism, explained his decision to the Irish Independent saying:

” ‘We just wanted to walk to show solidarity with what is a marginalised group in our society, to show them compassion, dignity and respect’…

” ‘Schools should not be places where students are ridiculed or made feel isolated…We are proud to be a Catholic school and it because of that we decided to walk as a group and give Christian witness’…

” ‘It may have been controversial but we have to challenge ourselves and the status quo…We can’t be bound by tradition. It’s in that context that we decided to march and I’m very proud of what we did.’ “

This latest news comes as Irish Catholic schools awaken to the problem of LGBT bullying, with many religious institutions in the Republic of Ireland already participating in the government’s “Stand Up! Awareness Week” and implementing LGBT education into curricula.

If you’re on Facebook, you can view further photos of St. Paul students marching by clicking here. If you’re on Twitter, consider thanking St. Paul’s Bessbrook (@StPaulsBBrook) for its inclusive witness, and also thank Burns (@jburns832) for his ongoing leadership.

Dubliners March for Marriage Equality

Irish Catholics were among the thousands who marched through Dublin in support of marriage equality earlier this month, reports NewsTalk. The march comes as the Republic of Ireland prepares for a constitutional referendum on the issue to be held early next year, with early polls indicating only 20% of voters opposing legal recognition for same-gender couples. Marriage equality is also supported by Taoiseach [Prime Minister] Enda Kenny and several high-profile ministers. The Irish Catholic bishops oppose the measure and have threatened to withdraw from civil marriage processes if it passes, though many observers believe their influence in Irish politics is limited and wanes further as time progresses.

Mary McAleese

McAleese Advertisement Banned

Former Irish President Mary McAleese has routinely condemned the church’s hierarchy for their approach to and teachings on homosexuality, calling for Catholics to rethink sexual ethics in light of modern science and knowledge. For this, and her support of women’s ordination, an Australian Catholic newspaper, the Catholic Weekly, has banned advertisements for McAleese’s upcoming appearance at Sydney’s “Catalyst for Renewal,” an event focused on the discussion of Catholic issues later this month. Irish Central reports that the paper’s editor Peter Rosengren said that neither he nor the Church “see homosexuality as a sin.”  The newspaper article noted that Rosengren added:

“. . .that having once employed a gay person at his newspaper he believed he had achieved a special degree of insight into homosexuality.”

 

In a related note, Irish Americans can now celebrate a more inclusive St. Patrick’s Day in 2015 as the New York City parade will feature an explicitly LGBT contingent and be led by Cardinal Dolan who said he welcomed the decision. For Irish Catholics of all types, the rainbows of inclusion and welcome continue to grow and grow!

Stay tuned for another post with good news from Ireland later this week!

–Bob Shine, New Ways Ministry


Ignorance of Catholic Teaching Warps Cardinal’s Comments on Homosexuality

September 7, 2014

Cardinal Onaiyekan

A recent interview with Nigeria’s Cardinal John Olorunfemi Onaiyekan, archbishop of Abuja, illustrates one important reason why LGBT people still do not have full equality in the Catholic Church:  Church leaders do not know their own teaching and they publicly speak mistakes about it.

The cardinal was interviewed recently by The Sun, a national newspaper in Nigeria.   During the interview, the reporter asked:

“Do you foresee the Catholic Church sustaining its stance on gay marriage in the future?”

The cardinal’s complete answer to the question was:

“Unfortunately, we are living in a world where these things have now become quite acceptable but for the fact that they are acceptable doesn’t mean that they are right. The Catholic Church considers itself as carrying the banner of the truth in the world that has allowed itself to be so badly deceived.

“On gay marriage or homosexuality in general, everybody knows that the Catholic Church is about the only group that among the Christian groups that has stood very firmly against it and we insist that it is against God’s will. Therefore, it is not a question of something for us to discuss and decide whether we shall accept it or not. Even if people don’t like us for it, our church has always said homosexuality is unnatural and marriage is between a man and a woman. There is no such thing as marriage between two men or marriage between two women. Whatever they do among themselves should not be called marriage. There is no question of the Catholic Church changing its positions on this matter.”

What’s wrong with that statement?  Well, for one thing, church teaching does not state that homosexuality is “unnatural.”  In one of the earliest Vatican statements on homosexuality in the modern era, 1975’s Declaration on Certain Questions Concerning Sexual Ethicsthe Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) wrote:

“A distinction is drawn, and it seems with some reason, between homosexuals whose tenecy. . . is transitory or at least no incurable; and homosexuals who are definitively such because of some kind of innate instinct. . . “

The particular term, “innate instinct,” indicates that the Vatican does not label a homosexual orientation as “unnatural.”   In The Catechism of the Catholic Church, which appeared almost two decades later, the Vatican discussed homosexuality, saying, in part:

“Its psychological genesis remains largely unexplained.”

and

“The number of men and women who have deep-seated homosexual tendencies is not negligible.”

While the CDF also used the term “objective disorder” to describe a homosexual orientation, it is important to underline that the term does not refer to a medical or psychological condition, but to moral evaluation.  In the 1986 Letter to the Bishops of the Catholic Church on the Pastoral Care of Homosexual Persons, the CDF wrote:

“Although the particular inclination of the homosexual person is not a sin, it is a more or less strong tendency ordered toward an intrinsic moral evil; and thus the inclination itself must be seen as an objective disorder.”

Moreover, Church teaching never makes a blanket against “homosexuality,” as Cardinal Onaiyekan does.  Church teaching makes a distinction between homosexual people and homosexual acts.  As the above quotation indicates, the Church does not morally disapprove of homosexual people (“not a sin”), but it does not morally approve of homosexual activity.   Lumping both people and acts under the title “homosexuality” is not responsible use of language, and neither does it show a careful awareness of Church teaching.

Thus, though Church teaching, based on natural law philosophy, does not approve of any sexual activity between people of the same gender, it does not describe either the act or the person as “unnatural.”   I grant that this is a very fine, nuanced distinction, and, even at that, is still problematic.   But it is important to make the distinction to see that someone like Cardinal Onaiyekan either does not understand the Church’s official position or is describing this position carelessly, perhaps influenced by his own prejudiced opinions on the matter.

Personally, I do not like splitting hairs like this theologically, but it is important to do so because of the tremendous harm that the cardinal’s words can have, especially in a nation like Nigeria where homosexuality is criminalized.  Such ignorance or carelessness on the part of a Church official fuels the homophobia that causes violence.

Finally, some comments in regard to the cardinal’s statement:

“On gay marriage or homosexuality in general, everybody knows that the Catholic Church is about the only group that among the Christian groups that has stood very firmly against it and we insist that it is against God’s will.”

First of all, in Africa, as elsewhere, the Catholic Church is not the only religious institution which opposes same-gender marriage, and, as we saw above, the Church does not condemn “homosexuality in general.” More importantly, though, using language to describe homosexuality as “against God’s will” again strengthens negative attitudes which often lead to physical and emotional harm.  In fact, the Catechism says of homosexual people:

“These persons are called to fulfill God’s will in their lives. . . “

and

“They must be accepted with respect, compassion, and sensitivity. Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided.”

Unfortunately, this is not the first time that Cardinal Onaiyekan, and, indeed, other Church leaders, have expressed statements that reveal more ignorance than wisdom on the topic.  For an earlier post about this topic, click here.

It is astonishing that someone in Cardinal Onaiyekan’s position would be so ignorant or careless regarding Church teaching.  To me, it is an indication that cultural attitudes and personal biases, unfortunately, creep into our church’s official rhetoric.  Such mis-education is harmful to LGBT people, the wider Church, and Cardinal Onaiyekan himself.

–Francis DeBernardo, New Ways Ministry

Related post

Bondings 2.0:  “Nigerian Bishops Support Anti-Gay Law; Help Get the Pope to Speak Out

 

 


Catholic and LGBT: Which Is the Harder Coming Out Process?

September 6, 2014

If you are an LGBT Catholic, which is the harder thing to do:  telling Catholic people you are LGBT or telling LGBT people that you are Catholic?  In over 20 years working with the Catholic LGBT community, I’ve more often heard people say that the latter is much harder than the former.

In U.S. Catholic this past summer, Jeffrey Essman examined why it is so difficult to “come out” as a Catholic in today’s world.  He notes that despite the recent change in tone on gay issues that Pope Francis has inaugurated, too many LGBT people still see religion generally, and Catholicism particularly, as the enemy.  The statistics bear this out:

“A recent Pew Research Center survey of LGBT Americans found that 48 percent of the respondents—more than twice the national average—consider themselves atheist/agnostic or simply have no religious affiliation. Of the 51 percent who do have a religious affiliation, 26 percent are Catholics, and two thirds of that 26 percent consider their own church to be unfriendly toward them. When respondents were asked to list the religions they considered most unfriendly, 8 in 10 put the Catholic Church on the list, along with the Mormon Church and Islam. “

Essman, who took a spiritual hiatus from religion for a while, notes how important it is for gay people to share their spirituality with one another.  In his case, it was another gay Catholic who helped to bring Essman back to the faith:

“. . . [T]he irony here is that it was a former boyfriend, a convert to Catholicism, who got me back into the church. I remember him telling me about his conversion experience, and I had never heard anyone, certainly not a gay man, talk so happily, so assuredly, so emphatically about his faith. Being in a relationship with him was an important layer of coming out for me, but it’s the moment of spiritual honesty that resonates with me still. I’m a Catholic. I’m a gay Catholic. And it grieves me to think that two thirds of my brothers and sisters don’t feel welcome in their own church. No one should feel unwelcome in a church—and certainly not in the church. “

Essman belongs to a New York City parish (which he doesn’t name) which has aided him on his spiritual journey by including him in the community in a way that is both unique and commonplace:

“. . . [G]enuine welcome goes far beyond acceptance and tolerance. Welcome is a joyous absurdity of openness and love, of oneness, and what I love most about my parish is that I’m not a gay Catholic there. I’m just a Catholic. There’s nothing special about me. On the contrary, I am appreciated but otherwise wonderfully taken for granted. It’s a genuine welcome that doesn’t just welcome you to church; it welcomes you to the baptism that made you church in the first place. “

And he reminds us that being part of the Catholic community is really so much more than doctrine:

“when I remember that, I remember why I’m in the church, why I’m one of the 26 percent. I’m not in the church for the catechism, I’m in it for the creed. I’m in it for the light and beauty I experience at the heart of Catholicism, far from any politics—far, even, from a good deal of theology. I’m in it for the spirit of the Eucharist, of scripture, and most of all for the spirit of the people I worship with every Sunday. A couple weeks ago I was sitting next to one of the older members of the parish and was in tears at the simplicity, intent, and quiet joy with which he sang the psalm response. No catechism can touch that. And it’s this experience of the church on the local level—which I think is the important one—that gives me hope for the church at large.”

(Editor’s note:  If you are seeking a local gay-friendly Catholic parish in your area, check out New Ways Ministry’s list of welcoming parishes and communities by clicking here.)

And finally, for Essman, as for so many other LGBT Catholics, reconciliation means coming to terms with both one’s weaknesses and strengths, and in healing one’s past:

“I’m a sinner just like everyone else at my parish, but my sin isn’t my homosexuality. The sinfulness of my being gay is that it tempted me, allowed me—encouraged me, really—to think that I was somehow set off from the rest of society, that I wasn’t really part of the world. The sin of my homosexuality is that it led me to believe lies—deadly, soul-killing lies—a sin for which I am indeed heartily sorry. But by the grace of God I’ve forgiven the people who told me those lies, and I’ve forgiven myself for believing them. And by the grace of the people I pray with every week, by the love they give me and the love I return, I move forward with them into the truth: I am part of society. I am part of nature. And I am very happily part of the church.”

So, how about you?  How did you reconcile being LGBT and being Catholic?  What is it about your faith that you treasure and that keeps you going?  What steps on your spiritual journey have helped you see yourself as a loved child of God?  What is the relationship between your sexuality/gender identity and your spirituality.  Feel free to share your reflections in the “Comments” section of this post.

–Francis DeBernardo, New Ways Ministry


Gay Group Marching in NYC St. Patrick’s Day Parade Is a Major Step Forward

September 5, 2014

An end to protests at NYC’s St. Patrick’s Day parade? Hopefully.

St. Patrick’s Day will be more LGBT-inclusive for New Yorkers next year, with organizers of that city’s parade announcing lesbian and gay people will, for the first time, be welcomed to participate via an LGBT contingent. Further news was made when N.Y.C’s Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the 2015 parade’s grand marshal, responded positively to the announcement of this change.

In a unanimous vote, the committee responsible for the St. Patrick’s Day parade selected OUT@NBCUniversal to march. According to the National Catholic Reporter:

“The committee said its ‘change of tone and expanded inclusiveness is a gesture of goodwill to the LGBT community in our continuing effort to keep the parade above politics.’

“The committee’s statement said the parade was ‘remaining loyal to church teachings…’ “

This decision comes after years of protest (a quick history is available via The New York Times here) over the exclusion of explicitly LGBT groups from the more than 300 contingents which march annually. The controversy came to a head last year when Guinness withdrew its sponsorship of the event and New York City Mayor Bill DeBlasio and other politicians  boycotted the paradeIrish Central also reports that NBC, which airs the parade every year, threatened to withdraw if LGBT groups were not allowed to participate.

Cardinal Dolan said he supported parade organizer’s decision, noting that the archbishops of New York have never had authority over the parade and that he “appreciated the cooperation of parade organizers in keeping the parade close to its Catholic heritage.” David Gibson of Religion News Service points out that while Dolan’s comments are progress, history tells a slightly different story:

“In 1993, then-Cardinal John O’Connor, facing gay protesters who staged a sit-in during the parade, vowed that he “could never even be perceived as compromising Catholic teaching” by entertaining their admission as an identifiable group in the event…”

Still, Catholics and LGBT advocates are welcoming both the parade committee’s decision and Dolan’s acceptance of it. The New York Times reports that many in New York’s Irish community support the decision, and there is a sense of relief that this controversy is over.Sarah Kate Ellis, president of GLAAD, was quoted in a separate New York Times article about the decision:

“It’s about time. Discrimination has no place on America’s streets, least of all on Fifth Avenue.”

An Associated Press story captured the remarks of Francis DeBernardo, executive director of New Ways Ministry.  The story stated that DeBernardo

“… thinks Dolan feels freer to take positions like his stand on the parade now that he is no longer the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

” ‘I think he’s able to be more of a pastor to the people of New York than he had been when he was on the national stage, bishops primarily are pastors and teachers and I think he’s fulfilling that role…I think Pope Francis has been teaching the bishops what being a pastor means.’ “

DeBernardo also wrote a letter to the editor published in the New York Times today which called the ban’s end “one more step toward the full equality of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in Catholic circles.” He continues:

“Too often, Catholics are told that the church cannot change its practices and policies about lesbians and gay men. The parade committee’s decision shows that even long-held and deeply entrenched prejudices can be overcome.

“This decision is a victory not only for lesbian and gay groups but for all Catholics, and indeed for all Americans. It not only recognizes the contributions of lesbians and gay men, but it also liberates others from paralyzing prejudices.

“Like St. Patrick driving the snakes out of Ireland, the parade committee members are driving the worn and self-defeating anti-gay prejudices out of their own hearts and organization.”

Celebrating St. Patrick’s Day through this parade has been a high-point for Irish Americans, and indeed New Yorkers of all backgrounds, since the late 18th-century. These celebrations will be even better now that LGBT people are welcomed in the spirit of Catholicism’s long tradition of social justice — and perhaps most pertinent here, the Irish charism of unbounded and warm hospitality.

–Bob Shine, New Ways Ministry


St. Louis School Fires Lesbian Couple Over Joint Mortgage Application

September 4, 2014

Back to school this fall has meant more LGBT church worker firings, bringing to 19 the number of employment issues in 2014 alone. The latest action happened at a Missouri Catholic school which fired two lesbian women, a teacher and a coach, after their relationship became public via a mortgage application.

Olivia Reichert and Christina Gambaro both worked at Cor Jesu Academy, an all-girls high school in St. Louis, before being asked to resign and then fired in July. Reichert and Gambaro were in a relationship unknown to co-workers or students and attained a civil union earlier this year in New York.

LGBTQ Nation reports that Cor Jesu Academy administrators received a copy of the couple’s mortgage application and decided to fire the two women for violating a so-called ‘morality clause’ in their contracts that requires church workers to abide by the hierarchy’s teachings. Though sexual orientation is not a protected class under Missouri law, Reichert and Gambaro are claiming discrimination, saying in a statement:

“We understand that, as a Catholic institution, Cor Jesu has an obligation to ensure that its employees serve as Christian role models…However, because they do not enforce the witness statement in any other way, this is a blatant case of discrimination.”

The two educators are ready to move on, however, and spoke positively about the school community, saying many school associates had privately expressed their discontent to the administration through letters and the withholding of donations before the story went public. Vital Voice reports:

“Gambaro says students and parents have sent many supportive messages and have congratulated her and her partner on their marriage. She also says that not going public was a tough decision.

” ‘When it came down to it, we still have to find new jobs, support ourselves and essentially start over…The stress of any negative responses to our story would have made moving on that much harder. And when it was all finished, the impact would have been minimal to say the least. The law is not on our side, nor is the church, so we have no ground to stand on. If we seriously thought it would make a difference, we would have taken a different approach.’ “

The school has refused to comment, saying it is a personnel matter.

Meanwhile, the wider Cor Jesu community, specifically alumnae, continue expressing their outrage over the firings and are seeking constructive responses. A private Facebook group has gained more than 2,000 members, and at least one alumna has expressed concern for LGBT students who may read the message they are not welcomed at the school. Another alumna, Mary Mcdetmott Benoist, invoking Pope Francis‘ message of mercy and inclusion, told Vital Voice:

” ‘I am sad to learn of CJA’s decision in light of what our Catholic leader, the Pope, teaches us about acceptance of all people…We need to hire teaches who are great at their jobs and set aside their personal lives.’ “

Perhaps most hopeful is the thought being circulated that alumnae and benefactors may withhold contributions to the school’s “One Heart, One Spirit, One Vision” capital campaign because of the firing of Reichert and Gambaro. The latter said of this effort:

” ‘You might not think this is much, but it has made enough of an impact that the administration has had to address the dip in support. That, to us, is a victory.’ “

In addition, Missouri State Representative Genise Montecillo, whose district includes Cor Jesu Academy, hopes to use the firings as a jumping off point for non-discrimination laws that include sexual orientation.

Gambaro, who noted there is no recourse under Missouri or canon law to challenge these firings, also expressed  that terminating talented and committed educators over their sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, or political views defies God’s law. In just the last few weeks, Bondings 2.0 has covered:

  • the firing of at least two lesbian women let go for becoming pregnant outside of marriages, even though they cannot legally attain marriages or have Catholic institutions recognize them;
  • a former Jesuit’s letter to Pope Francis pleading for help to save his vocation and create more LGBT inclusion for religious communities;
  • the firing of a Chicago-area parish’s beloved gay music director after he became engaged.

Though every firing of an LGBT church worker is a tragedy, this story out of Missouri is heartbreaking because the couple remained quiet as best they could and still ended up being fired.

For Bondings 2.0‘s full coverage of ‘Employment Issues,’ click the category to the right. For a full listing of LGBT-related firings, with links for further information, click here. And if you are interested in helping protect LGBT and ally church workers by implementing an inclusive non-discrimination policy at your local parish or Catholic school, more information on how to do this is available by clicking here.

–Bob Shine, New Ways Ministry


“If Nuns Ruled the World”–And Ran the Catholic Church

September 3, 2014

The title of a new book posits a hypothetical that would be intriguing to answer: If Nuns Ruled the World.  Even most of us who may may have feared nuns as youngsters have since grown to respect, admire, and love the dedication and commitment that these woman have made to the church and the world.  Even though they don’t “rule the world,” they have done so much good and changed so many lives and communities for the much better.

Sister Jeannine Gramick

Sister Jeannine Gramick

Author Jo Piazza interviewed ten Sisters for the book and devoted a chapter to each one’s life and ministry.  On The Huffington Post, she excerpted one chapter of that book into a a brief essay, and fortunately for Bondings 2.0 readers, that chapter was the one about New Ways Ministry’s co-founder, Sister Jeannine Gramick.

I’ll give a brief synopsis of that essay in this post, but if you want to read it in its entirety, you can click here.   Of course, if you want to read the whole chapter and the whole book, you can buy If Nuns Ruled the World:  Ten Sisters on a Mission (Open Road, September 2014) from your favorite bookseller.

The essay, entitled “A Catholic Nun Spent Her Life Fighting for LGBT Rights, Even Against Vatican Wishes” starts at the very beginning of Sister Jeannine’s ministry, back in 1971:

“How could Sister Jeannine Gramick have known that meeting a handsome gay stranger named Dominic at a house party on Spruce Street in West Philadelphia would completely change the course of her life?

“Dominic strode up to her. He was a baptized gay man who had left the Catholic Church because a priest told him that he was going to hell. He wasn’t alone. Most of his circle of gay friends hadn’t set foot in a church for years for the same reason.

“Dominic’s story made the young nun squirm. She knew there was a profound stigma against homosexuality, especially in conservative Philadelphia, but she despised the idea that the Church would exclude anyone for something so inconsequential. Dominic asked Sister Jeannine if she would be willing to host a home liturgy for him and his buddies, telling her he missed his faith and the Church. Anxious to help, to do something to heal his wounds, she agreed. . . .

“That was the beginning of Sister Jeannine’s fight for equality for gays and lesbians within the Catholic Church. Since 1977 she has been running New Ways Ministry, an organization that fights for equal rights.”

Sister Jeannine recognizes that she was encouraged in this ministry because other nuns, her community superiors, were forward-thinking women who saw this work as the work of God:

” ‘When we first began, my role was tenuous,’ Sister Jeannine told me. ‘No one in the Catholic community had been assigned to gay ministry before. It wasn’t even a thing. People were anxious about any sexual issues, much less homosexual ones. Those superiors were women of vision. They stood by me.’ “

As many know, however, not all church leaders approved of Sister Jeannine’s outreach.  Several investigations began, culminating in one led by the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.  The result of that investigation would bind Sister Jeannine even more closely to the LGBT community:

“In May of 1988 the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF), then headed by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, who would later become Pope Benedict XVI, ordered the nun to sign a “Profession of Faith,” declaring that she agreed with the Church’s official stance on homosexuality.

“Her community stood strong in support of her and her work, but they could not go against the Vatican’s final decree.

” ‘I felt that what was being asked of me was unjust … that lesbian and gay people are so marginalized in the Church that they need an advocate,’ Sister Jeannine said. ‘They need someone connected to the Church institution to speak on their behalf, and I felt that God was telling me, “There is still work that you need to do here.” ‘

“Sister Jeannine didn’t want to cause them needless pain or to draw more of the Vatican’s ire toward them, so she left them and moved to a new order — the Sisters of Loretto.

“Being an outcast of the Church hierarchy has helped Sister Jeannine relate even more to the people she serves.”

So despite attempts to silence her, Sister Jeannine continues her ministry of building bridges of justice and reconciliation between the LGBT community and the Catholic Church.  Of the Vatican’s attempt to end her ministry, she states:

“I don’t like people to say I was silenced. The Vatican tried to silence me and it just didn’t work.”

What Sister Jeannine knew is that fear and intimidation only work when people agree to submit to those tactics.  We give thanks to God that Jeannine stood firm.

Of course, as Sister Jeannine would say, the work of LGBT equality is the work of everyone, not just one person.  Who knows what happenstance conversations are occurring today like the one she and Dominic had over 40 years ago which changed her life and changed the direction of LGBT issues in the Catholic Church.  It’s up to everyone to take seriously the small calls from God that happen in our lives, and respond to them passionately and whole-heartedly.  Like Sister Jeannine did.  Like all nuns continue to do.

–Francis DeBernardo, New Ways Ministry

Related articles:

Bondings 2.0: Under the Vatican’s Dark Cloud, Nuns Continue to Suppport LGBT People

New York Times: “Sister Acts”

Time: The Great Nunquisition: Why the Vatican Is Cracking Down on Sisters”

 

 

NEWS NOTES: September 2, 2014

September 2, 2014

News NotesHere are some items that you might find of interest:

1) Catholics United, a faith-based political organization, has called on Archbishop Charles Chaput to do more to show support for transgender people in the wake of the suicide of a transgender young man, Riley Moscatel, in Philadelphia.   Moscatel was raised Catholic and had a Catholic funeral.

2) In Alberta, Canada,  St. Albert Catholic High alumnus Brent Saccucci is one of 10 recipients of the University of Alberta’s 2014 Peter Lougheed Scholarship, according to The St. Albert Gazette.  Saccuci, a gay man, studies education, and he is active in addressing inequities in schools, especially around young students of colour and those who are LGBTQ.

3)  Elliot Wehrle, a student at Mother Teresa Catholic High School in Ottawa, Canada, was the youth marshal for Ottawa Pride this past month.  Wehrle wrote Break Before Bend, a musical about coming out, which was performed at the school in March.

4) In the heavily Catholic nation of Ecuador, President Rafael Correa, has allowed same-sex couples in civil unions to list their status on their national identification cards, similar to the way marital status is listed.  Same-sex marriage is not legal in the country.

–Francis DeBernardo, New Ways Ministry


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