Gay Catholic’s Coming Out Is Affirmed by Easter Message

As we celebrate the Octave of Easter–the eight days of rejoicing at the Resurrection that began on Easter Sunday, it might add to our prayers to reflect on a recent coming out story written by a young gay Catholic for his college newspaper.

John Ferrannini, co-Editor-in-Chief at The State Hornet, the student publication at Sacramento State University, used the occasion of the Paschal Season to describe his reconciliation of his faith with his sexuality.  In ” ‘Coming out’ as a gay Catholic,” he writes:

John Ferrannini

“The church has beautiful things to teach about human sexuality — the symbol of the complete giving of oneself to the other. Without a moral guide on this journey, I certainly did some things I regret. I felt as though my choice was between a lonely repression or exciting but lonely promiscuity.

“But I refuse to believe that. And I realized that when, at Sunday mass again for the first time in a few months, I heard Jesus ask his father from the cross in the gospel reading ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?’

“. . . . He was so removed from his father that he asked why he had been abandoned, betrayed, scoffed at, beaten and left for dead.”

“But as Easter Sunday reveals, Jesus wasn’t really forsaken, because God never abandons his children. Jesus came, after all, to seek out and be with those rejected and derided by the society of his day — and ours.”

Ferrannini described the struggle and tension that he felt as he grew up as a gay teen:

“The religion is based on love, incarnate in the person of Jesus. Yet my love remains designated by the church an “objective disorder.”

“And so when I realized I was gay as a later teenager, I spent a lot of time asking why it had to be me, why this cross was the one I’d been chosen to bear.

“I asked myself what childhood trauma I must’ve gone through that made me this way.”

Despite the obstacles that Catholicism seemed to put in his way, he still found a pull towards the faith, but also began to trust his own experience:

“What attracted me to Catholicism was the certainty of knowing the absolute truth. Christ assured St. Peter that the gates of hell would never prevail against the church, that when the pope spoke doctrine we are bound to obey as though God himself were saying it.

“I was, as many are, content to accept Catholic teaching about homosexuality. But what got under my skin was the fact so many otherwise devout Catholics threw away so many teachings — particularly those championed by Pope Francis — because they were too ‘liberal.’ “

” . . . And in the meantime, the LGBT people I knew and worked with didn’t seem ‘objectively disordered.’ “

Ferrannini describes his acceptance of his sexual orientation, his temporary break from the church, and participation in activities that he did not find fulfilling.  And then the Easter moment described above seemed to break through for him, providing him with insight to be able to live creatively, not destructively, in the tension between faith and sexuality.

He offers an insight that would be important for many church and LGBT leaders to heed:

“. . . I learned that the awkward relationship between the church and the LGBT community hurts both.”

So true.  each group could benefit greatly by the gifts and insights that the other has.  From the time of St. Paul’s conversion on the road to Damascus,  the Christian tradition has always grown from the personal experiences that individuals of faith undergone.  The Church tests those experiences against its values and tradition to see if they are congruent with the faith.  As more LGBT people like Ferrannini continue to testify to the goodness and holiness they experience in the discovery of their sexuality or gender identity, the more opportunity the Church has to see the value that such people bring to the growth of the faith.

–Francis DeBernardo, New Ways Ministry, April 20, 2017

 

Nun and Priest Join With Other Irish Catholics Set to Vote “Yes” for Marriage Equality

 

Sr. Stanislaus Kennedy

In under ten days, Irish voters will decide on approving marriage equality in one of the world’s most historically Catholic nations. If approved, this will be the first popular vote to legalize same-gender marriages in the world — but what is also remarkable about Ireland’s story, regardless of the outcome, is how many Catholics are publicly endorsing LGBT rights.

Religious Sister of Charity Sr. Stanislaus Kennedy announced she will be voting “Yes” for marriage equality. Speaking at an unrelated conference on austerity policies, Kennedy said of the vote:

” ‘I have thought a lot about this…I am going to vote Yes in recognition of the gay community as full members of society. They should have an entitlement to marry. It is a civil right and a human right’…

” ‘I have a big commitment to equality for all members of society. It’s what my life has been about. We have discriminated against members of the gay and lesbian community for too long. This is a way of embracing them as full members of society.’ “

Sr. Kennedy works closely with those in Ireland experiencing homelessness, reports The Irish Times, and spoke against austerity measures because of the devastating impact they actually have had on families and will continue to have for years to come.

Fr. Gabriel Daly

Top theologian Fr. Gabriel Daly also urged Catholics to vote “Yes,” in an article published by Doctrine and Life, a publication of the Dominicans. Daly, a former theology professor at several universities, said the matter is “an issue for the State, not for the church.” He continued, as reported in The Irish Times:

” ‘Marriage as a sacrament is the proper concern of the church. If the Yes vote succeeds in Ireland, it will be for the church to decide whether to co-operate or not…[I am] unimpressed by the claim that allowing gay men and lesbian women to marry members of their own sex necessarily has an effect on the Christian idea of marriage…Christians are perfectly free to carry on without any threat to their customary understanding of marriage.’ “

Fr. Daly said Catholics could vote for marriage equality “with good conscience,” but did add that adoption of children by same-gender parents is a separate issue.

These endorsement are only the latest in a series of Catholic voices over the last year.

Sr. Jeannine Gramick speaking for equality in Ireland
Sr. Jeannine Gramick speaking for equality in Ireland

Sr. Jeannine Gramick, co-founder of New Ways Ministry, spoke in Ireland about supporting marriage equality several weeks ago saying “You can be Catholic and support civil marriage marriage for lesbian and gay people.

Former Irish president Mary McAleese, an outspoken critic of the church’s anti-LGBT policies and mother of a gay son, also promised to vote “Yes” for the good of Ireland’s children. Equality campaigners are appealing to Irish voters’ Catholic roots by emphasizing the good this will do for their loved ones, asking them to bring your family with you to the voting booth on May 22.

Fr. Martin Dolan of Dublin came out to parishioners during Mass in January, saying “I’m gay myself” as he called upon the church community to support LGBT rights. He was widely supported by his parish, which applauded him, while facing no public consequences from the archbishop as many feared he would.

Augustinian Fr. Iggy O’Donovan wrote a pro-marriage equality article, saying “respect for the freedom of others who differ from us is part and parcel of the faith we profess” and he knows more priests will vote “Yes” than many believe. Meanwhile, Irish parishioners have walked out of a Mass when the pastor preached an anti-gay homily.

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Ireland’s bishops have been less friendly, threatening at one point to stop performing civil marriages altogether if the referendum is approved. However, in a rare display of humility, Dublin’s Archbishop Diarmuid Martin admitted he is no expert on family life today. He also called anti-equality activists’ language “obnoxious,” said an “ethics of equality” was needed in the debate over LGBT rights, and, in the rarest of moves, joined Archbishop Eamon Martin of Armagh in publicly critiquing a fellow bishop who compared homosexuality to Down’s Syndrome.

New polling reported by Buzzfeed shows 78% of voters planning to vote “Yes” on May 22, but pro-equality campaigners are redoubling their efforts over fears support could drop in the final weeks due to confusion being sown by anti-LGBT activists. Regardless of the outcome, this movement in Ireland is revealing the best of Catholicism when it comes to LGBT justice and shows a way to dialogue publicly about divergent views while upholding the dignity of sexual and gender diverse persons.

–Bob Shine, New Ways Ministry